Another Look at Gluten-free Diet for Asymptomatic Celiac

Previously, a blog entry (Benefits of Gluten-Free Diet for “Asymptomatic” Celiac …) reviewed the abstract (available early online) from Gastroenterol 2014; 147: 610-17.  With the publication of the printed version, some useful commentary (Gastroenterol 2014; 147: 557-59) provides perspective.

Study limitations: small number (20 assigned to gluten-free diet, 20 regular diet).

Key points from editorialists:

  • “This study provides some of the strongest data yet supporting celiac disease screening of family members of patients with celiac disease.  However, important issues must be addressed before screening is widely adopted.”
  • “This [study] leaves us in the uncomfortable position of offering a diagnosis that may improve gastrointestinal symptoms, but simultaneously worsen socialization, offer limited overall change in health-related quality of life, and for which the long-term risk-to-benefit ratios are unknown.”
  • This “makes the cost of a gluten-free loaf of bread for all with asymptomatic celiac disease too high, unless and until additional more substantial benefits can be demonstrated.”

Related blog posts:

4 thoughts on “Another Look at Gluten-free Diet for Asymptomatic Celiac

  1. Pingback: Celiac Disease: “Ten Things That Every Gastroenterologist Should Know” | gutsandgrowth

  2. Pingback: Milder Celiac Disease Being Diagnosed Now | gutsandgrowth

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