Briefly Noted: Celiac Serology Normalization, Inflammatory Markers in Crohn’s Disease, Nutrition in Neurologically-Impaired

  • DM Isaac et al. JPGN 2017; 65: 195-99.

This retrospective study of 487 pediatric patients shows that it takes a long time to normalize celiac serology/anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (TTG). The median time was 407 days for the 80.5% of patients that normalized their serology in the study time frame.  The time was 364 days for those who were considered adherent to a gluten-free diet.  Patients with type 1 diabetes were less likely to normalize their TTG levels. Faster normalization occurred in those with lower titers at baseline.

Related blog posts:

  • A Alper et al. JPGN 2017; 65: e25-e27

In this chart review, among 135 children, normal ESR and CRP were observed in 28% of children with Crohn disease and 42% of children with ulcerative colitis.

Related blog post: Do you really need both a ESR and CRP?

  • C Romano et al. JPGN 2017; 65: 242-64

This guideline paper details 31 recommendations (some with multiple parts) for the evaluation and management of children with neurologic impairment.  The recommendations include detailed evaluations including knee heights, skinfold thickness measures, DXA scan, routine micronutrient bloodwork, along with a low threshold for oropharyngeal dysphagia assessment.  The paper has recommendations for evaluations of reflux, constipation, and dental problems.  The authors suggest “considering use of enteral feeding if total oral feeding time exceeds 3 hours per day.”

Related blog post: Surgery for reflux works best for those who need it the least

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.