Is it really necessary to check for Cytomegalovirus in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

A recent retrospective study (W El-Matary et al. JPGN 2018; 67: 221-24) examined the practice of looking for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in children with a flareup of their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which is currently recommended by expert consensus (JPGN 2018; 67: 292-310 –recommendation #3).

Key findings:

  • “Four of 61 patients encounters (6.6%) with UC/IBD-U, two with corticosteroid refractory disease, had positive biopsies for CMV by PCR but negative H&E and IHC.  They responded to escalated medical therapy, without needing anti-viral therapy.”
  • All children who had colectomy during the study did not have CMV detected in colonic mucosa.

The authors note that the rationale for looking for CMV is derived mainly from adult populations.  Since age is a known risk factor for CMV reactivation, the risk of CMV causing refractory IBD in children is less.

My take (borrowed in part from authors): “The low frequency of CMV in our study challenges current guidelines that recommend assessment for CMV in all pediatric patients with acute severe UC refractory to corticosteroids.”  This issue would be another that would benefit by collecting the experience of a large cohort (eg. ICN).

Related blog posts:

Patient T-shirt

Disclaimer: These blog posts are for educational purposes only. Specific dosing of medications (along with potential adverse effects) should be confirmed by prescribing physician.  This content is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a condition.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.