AGA Guidelines on the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis

A recent AGA Clinical Practice Guideline on the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis was published along with patient guide (pg 766-67), a brief summary (pg 768) (“spotlight”) and technical review.

  • CW Ko et al. Gastroenterol 2019; 156: 748-64.
  • S Singh, JD Feuerstein et al. Gastroenterol 2019; 156: 769-808.

Summary of Recommendations for the medical management of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis: (available from AGA Website, my comments in blue & I bolded some of the recommendations):

1.    Use either standard dose mesalamine (2-3 grams/day) or diazo-bonded 5-ASA [Balsalazide or Olsalazine] rather than low dose mesalamine, sulfasalazine or no treatment in patients with extensive mild-moderate UC. (Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence) [The article notes several potential exceptions for sulfasalazine: doing well on current treatment, prominent arthritic symptoms, or cost]

2.    In patients with extensive or left-sided mild-moderate UC, add rectal mesalamine to oral 5-ASA. (Conditional recommendation, moderate quality evidence)

3.    In patients with mild–moderate UC with suboptimal response to standard-dose mesalamine or diazo-bonded 5-ASA or with moderate disease activity, use high-dose mesalamine (>3 g/d) with rectal mesalamine. (Conditional recommendation, moderate-quality evidence [induction of remission], low-quality evidence [maintenance of remission])

4.    In patients with mild–moderate UC being treated with oral mesalamine, use once-daily dosing rather than multiple times per day dosing. (Conditional recommendation, moderate quality evidence) [In the commentary, the authors note that 4 RCTs have shown no differences when using equivalent dose once a day compared to divided dose and that once a day promotes adherence]

5.    In patients with mild–moderate UC, use standard-dose oral mesalamine or diazo-bonded 5-ASA, rather than budesonide MMX or controlled ileal-release budesonide for induction of remission. (Conditional recommendation, low quality of evidence)

6.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis or proctitis, use mesalamine enemas (or suppositories) rather than oral mesalamine. (Conditional recommendation, very-low-quality evidence) [In commentary, the authors note that oral mesalamine can be given based on patient preference, but that for distal disease there is likely a higher response with topical therapy]

7.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis who choose rectal therapy over oral therapy, use mesalamine enemas rather than rectal corticosteroids.(Conditional recommendation, moderate-quality evidence)

8.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctitis who choose rectal therapy over oral therapy, use mesalamine suppositories. (Strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence)

9.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis or proctitis being treated with rectal therapy who are intolerant of or refractory to mesalamine suppositories, use rectal corticosteroid therapy rather than no therapy for induction of remission. (Conditional recommendation, low-quality evidence)

10.    In patients with mild–moderate UC refractory to optimized oral and rectal 5-ASA, regardless of disease extent, add either oral prednisone or budesonide MMX. (Conditional recommendation, low-quality evidence)

11.    In patients with mild–moderate UC , AGA makes no recommendation for use of probiotics. (No recommendation, knowledge gap)

12.    In patients with mild–moderate UC despite 5-ASA therapy, AGA makes no recommendation for use of curcumin. (No recommendation, knowledge gap)

13.    In patients with mild–moderate UC without Clostridium difficile infection, AGA recommends fecal microbiota transplantation be performed only in the context of a clinical trial. (No recommendation for treatment of ulcerative colitis, knowledge gap)

Related blog posts:

Disclaimer: These blog posts are for educational purposes only. Specific dosing of medications/diets (along with potential adverse effects) should be confirmed by prescribing physician/nutritionist.  This content is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a condition

Joshua Tree National Park, Hike to Warren Peak

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.