Prospective Pediatric Study of the Persistence and Progression of Recurrent Abdominal Pain

J Sjolund et al. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021; 19: 930-938. Prevalence and Progression of Recurrent Abdominal Pain, From Early Childhood to Adolescence

Using a prospective, population-based Swedish cohort (1994-1996) (BAMSE project), the authors analyzed data from 2455 children with complete follow-up evaluation at ages 1, 2, 12, and 16 years.

Key findings:

  • RAP was reported by 26.2% of children on at least 1 of 3 assessment points, of which 11.3% reported symptoms more than once
  • Children with RAP at 12 years had persistent symptoms at 16 years in 45% of cases and increased risks for RAP (relative risk, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.7–2.8), any AP-FGID (relative risk, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.9–3.6), and IBS (relative risk, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.0–5.1) at 16 years
  • Figure 3 summarizes the overlap of RAP at different time points:
  • **In early childhood (1-2 years of age), 149 (6%) had RAP per parental reports. Only 27 in this group, had RAP noted at 16 years of age which accounted for 7% of the total 16 year old cohort with RAP
  • **At 12 years of age, 98 (4%) had RAP. 44 (45%) of this group continued with pain at 16 years which accounted for 11% of the total 16 year old cohort with RAP

My take: Most children (84%) with RAP at 16 years of age did NOT report RAP at younger ages; however, in children with RAP at 12 years of age, 45% continued to have RAP at 16 years of age.

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