You Still Need the Data

A recent study (J Pediatr 2014; 165: 23-9) confirmed the obvious: “early empiric antibiotic use in preterm infants is associated with lower bacterial diversity.”  That being said, you still need the data and the specific changes are of importance.

This study examined the stools from 74 preterm infants (≤32 weeks gestational age) and determined how the microbiota changed in relation to no antibiotics (18% of cohort), brief antibiotics (1-4 days) (64% of cohort), or ‘intensive’ antibiotics (5-7 days) (18% of cohort).  Empiric antibiotics consisted of ampicillin and gentamicin.  Stools were analyzed with the 16s ribosomal DNA community profiling.

The key findings are graphically shown in Figure 1 with pie charts showing the relative abundance of 10 bacterial genera at week 1, week 2, and week 3 in each of the three groups.

  • Those who received 5-7 days of antibiotics had the most changes in their microbiota with increased Enterobacter and lower bacterial diversity in the second and third weeks of life.
  • In those who received no empiric antibiotics there was increasing bacterial diversity noted sequentially.  These changes were not seen in either of the antibiotic groups. However, the group with brief antibiotic exposure returned to their baseline diversity by week 3.
  • Infants receiving early antibiotics experienced more cases of necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis and death than those who were not exposed to antibiotics (this was not proven to be casually-related).

Take-home message: This study proves that antibiotics change the microbiome in neonates and that neonates exposed to antibiotics may have complications as a result.  Better biomarkers (with rapid turn around time) would allow more careful selection of which neonates need empiric antibiotics.

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1 thought on “You Still Need the Data

  1. Pingback: Is CMV a Trigger for Necrotizing Enterocolitis? | gutsandgrowth

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