New Serology for Celiac Disease?

A recent study (RS Choung et al. Gastroenterol 156: 582-91) showed that synthetic neoepitopes of the transglutaminase-deamidated gliadin complex are better noninvasive biomarkers for detecting celiac disease and for monitoring mucosal healing.

Link to Graphical Abstract and Abstract: Synthetic Neoepitopes of the Transglutaminase–Deamidated Gliadin Complex as Biomarkers for Diagnosing and Monitoring Celiac Disease

The authors studied the serum samples from 90 patients with Celiac disease (CD) and from 79 healthy controls and developed a fluorescent peptide microarray platform  Then, the authors validated their findings in 82 patients with newly diagnosed CD and 217 controls.

Key findings:

  • 7% of patients with treated (with gluten free diet [GFD]) and healed CD had positive TTG-IgA and 27% of patients treated but unhealed CD mucosa had positive TTG IgA
  • With the synthetic neoepitopes, CD was identified with 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity.  The assay identified patients with CD with healed mucosa with an 84% sensitivity and 95% specificity.

My take: More precise noninvasive markers like these should help identify individuals with celiac disease and those who have responded (or not) to the recommended gluten free diet.

Related blog posts:

Unrelated but important —NPR reports on another large study showing that MMR does not cause autism -Link: A Large Study Provides More Evidence That MMR Vaccines Don’t Cause Autism 

Related blog post: “Too many vaccines and autism” debunked

Link to full text of study from Annals of Internal Medicine: Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccination and AutismA Nationwide Cohort Study

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