New HCV Treatment Effective in Adolescents –Important Study Now Published Online

A soon-to-be-published study (available online Hepatology) from WF Balistreri et al shows that the combination of Ledipasvir-Sofosbuvir is highly effective in pediatric patients aged 12-17 years.

Here is the abstract:

ABSTRACT

No all-oral, direct-acting antiviral regimens have been approved for children with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We conducted a Phase 2, multi-center, open-label study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ledipasvir–sofosbuvir in adolescents with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection. One hundred patients ages 12 to 17 years received a combination tablet of 90 mg ledipasvir and 400 mg sofosbuvir once daily for 12 weeks. On the 10th day following initiation of dosing, 10 patients underwent an intensive pharmacokinetic evaluation of the concentrations of sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and the sofosbuvir metabolite GS-331007. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percentage of patients with a sustained virologic response 12 weeks posttreatment (SVR12). Median age of patients was 15 years (range, 12-17 years). A majority (80%) were HCV treatment naïve, and 84% were infected through perinatal transmission. One patient had cirrhosis and 42 did not; in 57 patients the degree of fibrosis was unknown. Overall, 98% (98/100; 95% CI, 93% to 100%) of patients reached SVR12. No patient had virologic failure. The 2 patients who did not achieve SVR12 were lost to follow-up either during or after treatment. The 3 most commonly reported adverse events were headache (27% of patients), diarrhea (14%), and fatigue (13%). No serious adverse events were reported. AUCtau and Cmax values for sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and GS-331007 were within the predefined pharmacokinetic equivalence boundaries of 50% to 200% when compared with adults from Phase 2 and 3 studies of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir. Conclusion: Ledipasvir−sofosbuvir was highly effective in treating adolescents with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection. The dose of ledipasvir−sofosbuvir currently used in adults was well tolerated in adolescents and had an appropriate pharmacokinetic profile.

My take: This is great news for pediatric patients.  This study indicates that this breakthrough therapy (and likely others) for adults will become more widely available for pediatric patients soon.

TV sports analysts have tremendous  insight!

TV sports analysts have tremendous insight!  Virginia needs to score enough points to win.

Hepatitis C : New and Newer Treatments

A recent study (KR Reddy et al. Hepatology 2015; 62: 79-86) shows that the combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir is a safe, effective therapy for patients with genotype 1 Hepatitis C (HCV) and compensated cirrhosis.

The authors performed a post-hoc analysis of seven clinical trials in 513 treatment-naive and previously treated patients; 69% were previously treated. Key findings:

  • Overall, 493 (96%) achieved an SVR12; 98% of treatment-naive patients achieved an SVR12.
  • However, many patients in this analysis had received ribavirin.  In those treated without ribavirin (ledipasvir/sofosbuvir alone), the SVR12 was 90%.
  • Most common adverse effects included headache (23%), fatigue (16-19%), and asthenia (14-16%).

Bottomline: While ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was effective in this population, the 90% SVR12 is not as good as 96%.  This leads to the question of whether ribavirin is needed as well.

Related & briefly noted: SA Alqahtani et al. Hepatology 2015; 62: 25-30.  Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir treatment (8-24 weeks) resulted in SVR of 97% (with or without ribavirin) among the 1952 patients treated in the ION-1, ION-2, and ION-3 studies.

Related blog posts:

From FDA (July 24th): FDA approves new treatment for chronic hepatitis C genotype 3 infections

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Daklinza (daclatasvir) for use with sofosbuvir to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 infections. Daklinza is the first drug that has demonstrated safety and efficacy to treat genotype 3 HCV infections without the need for co-administration of interferon or ribavirin, two FDA-approved drugs also used to treat HCV infection….

The safety and efficacy of Daklinza in combination with sofosbuvir were evaluated in a clinical trial of 152 treatment-naive and treatment-experienced participants with chronic HCV genotype 3 infection. Participants received Daklinza 60 mg plus sofosbuvir 400 mg once daily for 12 weeks and were monitored for 24 weeks post treatment. The studies were designed to measure whether a participant’s hepatitis C virus was no longer detected in the blood 12 weeks after finishing treatment (sustained virologic response), suggesting a participant’s infection had been cured.

Results showed that 98 percent of the treatment-naive participants with no cirrhosis of the liver and 58 percent of the treatment-naive participants with cirrhosis achieved sustained virologic response. Of the participants who were treatment-experienced, 92 percent with no cirrhosis of the liver and 69 percent with cirrhosis achieved sustained virologic response. Daklinza labeling carries a Limitations of Use statement to inform prescribers that sustained virologic response rates are reduced in HCV genotype 3 infected patients with cirrhosis.

From FDA (July 24th): FDA approves Technivie for treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 4

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Technivie (ombitasvir, paritaprevir and ritonavir) for use in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 infections in patients without scarring and poor liver function (cirrhosis).

Technivie in combination with ribavirin is the first drug that has demonstrated safety and efficacy to treat genotype 4 HCV infections without the need for co-administration of interferon, an FDA-approved drug also used to treat HCV infection…

The safety and efficacy of Technivie with ribavirin were evaluated in a clinical trial of 135 participants with chronic HCV genotype 4 infections without cirrhosis. Ninety-one participants received Technivie with ribavirin once daily for 12 weeks. Forty-four participants received Technivie once daily without ribavirin for 12 weeks. The studies were designed to measure whether a participant’s hepatitis C virus was no longer detected in the blood 12 weeks after finishing treatment (sustained virologic response), suggesting a participant’s infection had been cured.

Results showed that 100 percent of the participants who received Technivie with ribavirin achieved a sustained virologic response. Of those who received Technivie without ribavirin, 91 percent achieved sustained virologic response.

Garden of the Gods, Colorado Springs

Garden of the Gods, Colorado Springs