#NASPGHAN17 Why Rome IV Criteria are important

More information from this year’s annual NASPGHAN meeting.

This blog entry has abbreviated/summarized this presentation. Though not intentional, some important material is likely to have been omitted; in addition, transcription errors are possible as well.

The following slides highlight a terrific lecture by Carlo DiLorenzo (Nationwide Children’s Hospital).  Subsequently, I’ve included slides from Miranda van Tilburg (UNC); I was unable to attend her lecture and found some of the slides via twitter.

Key points:

  • Rome IV criteria are helpful, particularly with less common presentations like rumination
  • There has been an increase in nausea.  Morning nausea can be equated as a marker of anxiety until proven otherwise.
  • There is improved wording. “After appropriate medical evaluation, the symptoms cannot be attributed to another condition” may help facilitate the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, for example, in patients with IBD who are in remission.

From Miranda Tilburg:

2 thoughts on “#NASPGHAN17 Why Rome IV Criteria are important

  1. Pingback: Are There Any Babies with a Normal GI Tract? | gutsandgrowth

  2. Pingback: Prevalence of Rome IV Functional Bowel Disorders in Adults (US, UK, Canada) & Largest Study to Date on Hydroxychloroquine for COVId-19 | gutsandgrowth

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