Is Tenofovir the Best Medication for Hepatitis B Infection?

Two recent studies have suggested that tenofovir may be more effective for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections.

  • T C-F Yip et al. Gastroenterol 2020; 158: 215-25.
  • J Choi et al. JAMA Oncol 2019; 5: 30-6. (Reviewed in a commentary by P Lampertico, M Colombo. Gastroenterol 2019; 157: 1682-88)

In the first retrospective study from Hong Kong, the authors analyzed 29,350 consecutive treated-patients  (mean age 52.9 years).  1309 were treated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDV) and 28,041 were treated with entecavir. Key findings:

  • TDF-treated patients were younger (mean age 43.2 years vs. 53.4 years) and had less cirrhosis at baseline (2.9% vs. 13.6%).
  • After a median follow-up of 3.6 years, 8 TDF-treated patients (0.6%) and 1386 (4.9%) of entecavir-treated patients developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).  The authors note that TDF maintained a lower rate of HCC after propensity score weighting (hazard ratio of 0.36)

The second study was a nationwide population cohort database with >24,000 patients –all with ALT >80. Key finding:

  • HCC was significantly lower in TDF group than in the entecavir group, the percent person-years being 0.64 compared to 1.06; though, there was not a lower mortality rate or a lower liver transplantation rate.

The commentary associated with the latter study makes the following points:

  • Both TDF and entecavir could prevent “the incidence and mortality of HCC …in >85% of patients who received [them] for years.”
  • Studies comparing TDF and entecavir have come up with conflicting results.  “Three studies in Korea, the U.S, and Europe reported no differences between NAs even after patient matching by a propensity score.”
  • “Cumulatively, all these studies deliver the reassuring message of a robust risk reduction of liver cancer taking place in patients with chronic hepatitis B who experience prolonged virus suppression after NA therapy, but currently they fail to provide convincing evidence that one NA is superior to the other one in determining such clinical benefit.”

My take: Tenofovir may be better but the answer is not definitive; due to lack of randomization, there may still be confounding variables in which sicker patients are receiving entecavir and this could be contributing to the difference in outcomes.  Also, in patients with bone disease and renal impairment, tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) or entecavir is recommended.

Related blog posts:

From P’tit Train Du Nord Linear Park

3 thoughts on “Is Tenofovir the Best Medication for Hepatitis B Infection?

  1. Pingback: When Can You Safely Stop Nucleos(t)ide Treatment for Hepatitis B? & Reassessment of Ventilator Success for COVID-19 | gutsandgrowth

  2. Pingback: Liver Shorts -May 2020 & CDC Recommendations for Office (NY Times Summary) | gutsandgrowth

  3. Pingback: Big Advance for Hepatitis B, Plus One | gutsandgrowth

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