Ustekinumab for Refractory Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis and Updated Adalimumab Dosing

As noted in previous blog posts (see below), adult guidelines for ulcerative colitis favor ustekinumab over vedolizumab for ulcerative colitis patients who have had anti-TNF therapy; recent pediatric guidelines appeared to do the opposite, possibly due to limited data with ustekinumab.

A recent study (J Dhaliwal et al. AP&T 2021; https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.16388. One‐year outcomes with ustekinumab therapy in infliximab‐refractory paediatric ulcerative colitis: a multicentre prospective study) provides prospective data on ustekinumab effectiveness when given to children with UC refractory to other biologics; n=25. Thanks to Ben Gold for this reference.

Key findings:

  •  All patients had failed prior infliximab therapy, and 12 (48%) also had failed vedolizumab.  Five patients discontinued ustekinumab after IV induction (four undergoing colectomy).
  • On intent to treat basis, 44% (n=11) achieved the primary endpoint of steroid‐free remission at week 52, including nine (69%) of 13 who previously treated with anti‐TNF only vs two (17%) of 12 who previously failed also by vedolizumab. Seven of 11 remitters met the criteria for endoscopic improvement.
  • Higher trough levels were not associated with a superior rate of clinical remission; the median (IQR) trough levels (μg/mL) were greater with q4 vs q8 weekly dosing (8.7 [4.6‐9.9] vs 3.8 [12.7‐4.8]) P = 0.02.
  • No adverse events were associated with therapy.

My take: Ustekinumab is a good option for pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis who are refractory to anti-TNF agents. More data are needed to help in positioning therapies.

Also, Humira (adalimumab) is now FDA-approved for children as young as 5 years with ulcerative colitis: FDA Approves Adalimumab as Treatment for Children With Ulcerative Colitis (2/25/21). “This approval is based on results from the phase 3, randomized, double-blind, multicenter ENVISION I (NCT02065557) study.” Abbvie has now updated their Humira dosing recommendations (Reference:  https://www.rxabbvie.com/pdf/humira.pdf). Thanks to Clair Talmadge for this update.

Disclaimer: This blog, gutsandgrowth, assumes no responsibility for any use or operation of any method, product, instruction, concept or idea contained in the material herein or for any injury or damage to persons or property (whether products liability, negligence or otherwise) resulting from such use or operation. These blog posts are for educational purposes only. Specific dosing of medications (along with potential adverse effects) should be confirmed by prescribing physician.  Because of rapid advances in the medical sciences, the gutsandgrowth blog cautions that independent verification should be made of diagnosis and drug dosages. The reader is solely responsible for the conduct of any suggested test or procedure.  This content is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a condition.

4 thoughts on “Ustekinumab for Refractory Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis and Updated Adalimumab Dosing

  1. Is there any movement towards including checking drug levels (and antibodies) as part of the dosing strategy? Like adding it to the FDA guidelines so insurance would need to accept routine drug levels as part of treatment?

    • Not sure when proactive monitoring will be widely accepted by payers for biologics like ustekinumab and vedolizumab. Even for anti-TNF agents, it is not uncommon to receive denials from insurance despite very good studies supporting their use

  2. Pingback: Can We Learn to Live With Germs Again? | gutsandgrowth

  3. Pingback: For the Next Insurance Appeal: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Adalimumab Treatment (Pediatrics) & Satire on Prior Authorizations | gutsandgrowth

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.