Economic Burden of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Fewer Operations and Emerging Treatments

Pouillon, L., Travis, S., Bossuyt, P. et al. Head-to-head trials in inflammatory bowel disease: past, present and futureNat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41575-020-0293-9 (Thanks to KT Park for this reference)

An excerpt:

This Perspective provides an overview of the past, current and future concepts in IBD trial design, with a detailed focus on the role of comparative research and the challenges and pitfalls in undertaking and interpreting the results from such studies.

Related blog posts:

GR Lichenstein et al. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2020; 18: 889-97.  Using Truven MarketScan Insurance Claims data (2008-2015) from more than 160,000 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the authors estimated economic burdens from Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).

  • For CD, lifetime incremental cost was $416,352 on average, but was $707,711 if diagnosis was established between 0-11 years of age. The lifetime costs, $622,056, consisted of $273,056 for outpatient care, $164,298 for inpatient care, $163,722 for pharmacy costs, and $20,979 for emergency room care.
  • For UC, lifetime incremental cost averaged $230,102, but was $369,955 if diagnosis was established between 0-11 years of age. The lifetime costs, $405,496, consisted of $153,670 for outpatient care, $123,190 for inpatient care, $105,142 for pharmacy costs, and $13,493 for emergency room care.
  • The lifetime costs for UC and CD were both greater than that for rheumatoid arthritis ($100,273) and for type 2 diabetes ($89,064).
  • Related blog postIBD Shorts 2020  Cost of IBD Care is Increasing. From Healio Gastro: Chronic inflammatory disease expenditures nearly double over last 2 decades

T Shinagawa et al. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2020; 18: 898-907.  In this study from Japan with 1871 patients with CD, the 5- and 10-year reoperation rates were 23.4% and 48.0% respectively.  However, reoperation rates were significantly lower after 2002 than prior with HR 0.72.  Postoperative use of immunomodulators (OR 0.60) and anti-TNF therapy (HR 0.71) were associated with a reduced the risk of reoperation.

CCFA Conference Notes 2016 (part 5) -Emerging Therapies

This blog entry has abbreviated/summarized this terrific presentation; most of the material has been covered in this blog in prior entries (can use search function to find additional relevant material) but still this was a useful review. Though not intentional, some important material is likely to have been omitted; in addition, transcription errors are possible as well.

Emerging Therapies in IBD –Dr. Gary Lichtenstein

Background: This lecture started with a review of current therapies. We have learned how to use our current therapies better. There still remain a large number of patients that face surgery with IBD; though there has been improvement (?50% reduction).

Issues with thiopurines were reviewed. May take 2-6 months to take effect, though monotherapy with thiopurines are fairly ineffective for Crohn’s disease as initial therapy.

Leukocyte Trafficking Agents:

  • Natalizumab
  • Vedolizumab
  • AJM300 –oral agent. Initial safety data were fine.
  • AMG 181
  • Etrolizumab (Vermeire S Lancet 2014) –low rates of endoscopic healing, but better than placebo

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 12.15.26 PM

PF-00547,659

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 12.15.52 PM

S1P Modulators:

Fingolimod

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 12.16.26 PM

Ozanimod (RPC1063) (oral agent, fairly rapid onset) causes S1P-r on lymphocytes to be internalized –more selective than Fingolimod. Good safety has been noted thus far.  No notable cardiac problems. Infrequent elevations of transaminases; this issue will need to be followed.

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 12.16.38 PM

Tofacitinib oral Janus Kinus (JAK) Inhibitor (Sanborn WJ et al. NEJM 2012; 367: 616-24). Dr. Lichtenstein thinks 10 mg will be recommended dose. Follow lipids. For UC

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 12.17.11 PM

Mongerson related post: Mongerson -Phase II Data Available in NEJM | gutsandgrowth

 

Ustekinumab

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 12.18.05 PM

Related article from GI & Hep News: Ustekinumab for complex Crohn’s from ECCO conference/UNITI-1 Study (n=741)

FMT.  Further studies are needed

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 12.18.17 PM

Does Sun Exposure Lower the Risk of Crohn Disease?

An intriguing recent study suggests that individuals who spend more time outside are less likely to develop Crohn disease (CD) (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2014; 20: 75-81).

In this prospective cohort study from France, 123 cases of inflammatory bowel disease (45 CD, 71 ulcerative colitis, and 7 indeterminant colitis)  developed among the 91,870 women in the study.  The study period had a mean followup of 13.1 years and followed women between 40 and 65 years. The authors estimated residential sun exposure by utilizing a database (derived from satellite collection) containing the mean daily ultraviolet radiation dose for each French county.

Key findings:

  • Higher levels of sun exposure were associated with a decreased risk of Crohn disease with a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 0.49.
  • Sun exposure did not affect the likelihood of developing UC (HR 1.21).
  • In women with information about dietary vitamin D intake, higher sun exposure had a HR of 0.29 for developing CD.  That being said, the authors note a low dietary vitamin D intake in their population.

Despite the large cohort, this study has a number of limitations. The absolute number of IBD patients can lead to a Type 1 error (false-positive conclusion).  In addition, the age of the study population and the lack of data regarding individual sun exposure limit the conclusions as well.  Besides these factors, there may be confounders such as changes in diet and soil exposure which are not accounted for.

At the same time, there have been other studies which have shown a latitude effect.  As with this study, those living in sunny areas had a lower incidence of CD.

Bottomline: This study suggests that additional sun exposure is associated with a lower risk of developing Crohn disease.  Whether this lower risk is directly through better vitamin D levels or simply an epiphenomenon is unclear.

Other recent unrelated studies:

Gut 2013; 62: 1122-30.  A randomized phase 1 study of etrolizumab (rhuMAb β-7) in moderate to severe ulcerative colitis.  Etrolizumab is an adhesion cell molecular blocker.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2014; 20: 21-35.  Meta-analysis of 23 randomized controlled trials of probiotics for UC, Pouchitis, and CD.  Probiotics, in particular VSL#3, increased UC remission rates and helped maintain remission in patients with pouchitis.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2014; 20: 213-27. Review article of cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.  Good pictures of multiple problems including metastatic Crohn disease, erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet’s syndrome, aseptic abscess syndrome, and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2013; 19: 1753-63.  Review on hair loss associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Remember telogen effluvium?

Related posts:

For those who read from the top to the very bottom, here’s a tangential question: Do you know what a “sun dog” is?   Sun dog – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia