Prevalence of Bloodstream Infections in Children with SBS and Fever

Abstract Link: Prevalence of Bloodstream Infections in Children With Short‐Bowel Syndrome With a Central Line Presenting to Emergency Department With Fever

AC Fifi et al JPEN; https://doi.org/10.1002/jpen.1701

This retrospective study with 246 encounters identified the rate of bloodstream infections (BSI) in children with short bowel syndrome (SBS).

Key findings:

  • The adjusted calculated prevalence rate for BSI in children with SBS and fever was 55% (95% CI, 42.3%–65.4%)
  • There were 114 gram‐negative infections (72.6%), 46 gram‐positive infections (29.3%), and 17 fungal infections (10.8%)
  • Each additional 10 units above 20 mg/L CRP increased the odds of BSI by 26%. There was no association between WBC count and the presence of BSI

My take: This study supports the practice of using broad‐spectrum antibiotics in children with SBS and fever.

Related blog posts:

Atlanta Botanical Garden

#NASPGHAN19 Intestinal Failure Session Part 2

Our Spooky Pumpkin

Here are some notes and a few slides from NASPGHAN’s plenary session.  There could be errors of transcription in my notes.

Benjamin Gold, NASPGHAN president and part of our GI group, GI Care For Kids, welcomed everyone to the meeting.

Link to NASPGHAN_Annual_Meeting_Program 2019

Beth Carter  Trophic Growth Factors: A Practical View

Key Points:

  • GLP-2 has been approved as agent for intestinal failure for children (May 2019)
  • Studies thus far have shown good safety but concerns remain (?increased risk of polyposis, increased growth of neoplasm) and as such increased surveillance needed for patients receiving GLP-2
  • Cost in adults ~$295,000 per year
  • Most patients need to continue GLP-2 to maintain effect

Arthur Kasti  Abstract 218  Microbial Metabolites as Markers of Intestinal Dysbiosis in Pediatric Short Bowel Syndrome

This was a terrific presentation. Key points:

  • Microbiome in SBS patients is less diverse
  • Current diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth is difficult and definitive diagnosis is often impractical
  • Several metabolites may be helpful in diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth

Disclaimer: This blog, gutsandgrowth, assumes no responsibility for any use or operation of any method, product, instruction, concept or idea contained in the material herein or for any injury or damage to persons or property (whether products liability, negligence or otherwise) resulting from such use or operation. These blog posts are for educational purposes only. Specific dosing of medications (along with potential adverse effects) should be confirmed by prescribing physician.  Because of rapid advances in the medical sciences, the gutsandgrowth blog cautions that independent verification should be made of diagnosis and drug dosages. The reader is solely responsible for the conduct of any suggested test or procedure.  This content is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a condition.

#NASPGHAN19 Intestinal Failure Session Part 1

Here are some notes and a few slides from NASPGHAN’s plenary session.  There could be errors of transcription in my notes.

Benjamin Gold, NASPGHAN president and part of our GI group, GI Care For Kids, welcomed everyone to the meeting.

Link to NASPGHAN_Annual_Meeting_Program 2019

John Kerner  Potential Role of New Fat Emulsions

Key points:

  • Both SMOFlipid and Omegaven help prevent and/or treat parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis.
  • SMOFlipid is much less expensive (see slide below) -50 gm of SMOFlipid ~$5 compared to 10 gm of Omegaven at $35, thus omegaven costs more than 30 times SMOFlipid.
  • Though SMOFlipid is not FDA approved in children, it is being used widely and allows for increased calories compared to lipid minimization with intralipid and could improve neurocognitive outcomes.
  • SMOF dosing (listed below) with goal of 3 g/kg in preterm infants.
  • Resolution of cholestasis does not mean reversal of cirrhosis.  Thus, lipid emulsion intervention at earlier stage may be important.

Bram Raphael  Getting In Line: Towards a Clinical Practice Guideline For CVC Salvage

Key points:

  • Several infections are very difficult to clear, especially yeast, enterococcus, and pseudomonas
  • Salvaging central lines may obviate the need for multi-visceral transplant which carries a 5-year ~50% mortality rate
  • Cefepime provides good gram-negative coverage; consider meropenem in those with septic shock

Disclaimer: This blog, gutsandgrowth, assumes no responsibility for any use or operation of any method, product, instruction, concept or idea contained in the material herein or for any injury or damage to persons or property (whether products liability, negligence or otherwise) resulting from such use or operation. These blog posts are for educational purposes only. Specific dosing of medications (along with potential adverse effects) should be confirmed by prescribing physician.  Because of rapid advances in the medical sciences, the gutsandgrowth blog cautions that independent verification should be made of diagnosis and drug dosages. The reader is solely responsible for the conduct of any suggested test or procedure.  This content is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a condition.

Bone Health, Especially for IBD and Short Gut

Several colleagues with birthdays this week and next–Happy Birthday!

At our ICN population management meeting (as well as at a recent nutrition colloquium), Dr. Karen Loechner provided a timely update on bone health for our group.  Some of her slides are pictured below and a link to full slides follows.

Some of the points that I found interesting:

  • New hologic scans are much quicker (as little as 15 secs for some images) than typical DXA scans
  • While sodas have been associated with weaker bones, the main mechanism is likely displacement of milk from diet rather than direct effects
  • Adjust DXA results for height age
  • Think about vertebral compression fractures in children with mobility problems and painful symptoms

 

 

Full Link: Sticks and Stones Pediatric Osteoporosis

 

Methylmalonic Acid as a Biomarker of Vitamin B12

A recent case study (L Jimenez et al. J Pediatr 2018; 192: 259-61) showed that methylamalonic acid (MMA) can be elevated in the absence of vitamin B12 deficiency.

Background:

  • Risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency: terminal ileal resection and gastric acid blockade
  • Manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency: megaloblastic anemia, bone marrow failure, demyelinating diseases, thrombosis, and psychiatric symptoms
  • Early assessment of vitamin B12 deficiency can be aided by MMA levels and homocysteine levels both of which are metabolized via vitamin B12-dependent pathways and are elevated in vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • MMA levels have higher sensitivity for vitamin B12 deficiency than vitamin B12 levels alone.

Key findings of this report:

  • In three children with short bowel syndrome, MMA levels were persistently elevated despite vitamin B12 supplementation and without other evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency
  • MMA levels declined after treatment of bacterial overgrowth
  • “It is hypothesized that propionate, a precursor to MMA, produced by excessive gut fermentation, is responsible for the elevation in plasma MMA levels.”

My take: this study is a good reminder of how MMA is useful in detecting vitamin B12 deficiency and points out that bacterial overgrowth may be an alternative explanation for elevated MMA levels.

Related blog posts:

Resources for Short Bowel Syndrome:

Disclaimer: These blog posts are for educational purposes only. Specific dosing of medications/diets (along with potential adverse effects) should be confirmed by prescribing physician/nutritionist.  This content is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a condition.

Bright Angel Trail, Grand Canyon

#NASPGHAN17 Presentations at Annual Meeting: GGT in PSC, Nutrition for Intestinal Failure

This blog entry has abbreviated/summarized this presentation. Though not intentional, some important material is likely to have been omitted; in addition, transcription errors are possible as well.

Improvement in GGT Predicts Event-free Survival in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Regardless of Ursodeoxycholic Acic Treatment. 

Mark Deneau et al. (Grand Watkins Prize).

Key points:

  • PSC is difficult to study due to its rarity and due to its slow progression; thus surrogate biomarkers are needed.
  • Alkaline phosphatase is not a good biomarker in children
  • GGT level at one year after diagnosis was predictive of prognosis
  • Ursodeoxycholic acid does not appear to be effective

Optimizing Nutrition in Intestinal Failure

Justine Turner, University of Alberta

Key points:

  • Human milk is an ideal “formula” for infants, including those with intestinal failure
  • Oral feedings are important
  • Combination of bolus feeds and continuous feeds is reasonable
  • SMOFlipid allows higher lipid dose administration without hepatoxicity; this may improve cognitive outcomes
  • Amino acid based formulas have higher osmolality which can contribute to diarrhea

Patients with >50% of small bowel and >50% of colon were most likely to achieve enteral autonomy (GIFT registry)